Pubs and Bars in Coimbra

Coimbra has plenty to keep you occupied for at least a day or two so you’re going to need some refreshment while you’re there. There is a lot of quality wine production in the regions surrounding Coimbra, try some "Bairrada" wine. Don't miss the "licor beirao", a national sweet liquor drink born and made in the region. Try the different varieties of firewater "Agua-Ardente". One is made only from grapes while the other is made from mixed fruit. Each have a unique and different after taste.

 

The city's large student population guarantees an active, sometimes raucous nightlife. You'll find the bars around the Sé Velha and its square, Largo da Sé Velha, packed with students, professors, and locals, who drink, gossip, and discuss academic priorities. Student celebrations in Coimbra include the Queima das Fitas (Burning of the Ribbons), a graduation ritual during the first or second week of May. Then loosely organized serenatas sing and wander through Coimbra's streets at unannounced intervals. It's impossible to predict when and where you're likely to find these spontaneous reminders of yesteryear.

Fangas Mercearia Bar

Fangas Mercearia Bar

In the heart of Coimbra’s old town, next to the Almedina Door, Fangas is the go-to destination for petiscos (Portuguese tapas) and a great spot in which to try wines hailing from all over the country, with a deservedly special note of commendation going to their famous sangria. The restaurant is embedded in the old medieval walls of the city and named after the location in which farmers traded grain seeds until the late 18th century. Enjoy mussels cooked in a spicy marinade or a selection of baked field mushrooms with coriander and cream cheese.

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aCapella

aCapella

One the most captivating venues in Coimbra is àCapella, a cultural center that doubles up as a bar and restaurant. What gives this venue its extra special edge is the location within a former church, benefiting from a stunning interior and conspicuous presence in the middle of the small square. Built in the 14th century, àCapella was part of a complex designed to support pilgrims on their way to Santiago de Compostela.

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